Team

Juno: A Life Long Journey

Hear the Juno team discuss the anticipation and the lifelong curiosity that has helped make the mission a reality.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  • Scott
    Bolton

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI)


    JUNO ROLE

    Principal Investigator (PI), responsible for overall success of NASA mission and leader of the science team. Analysis and interpretation of microwave radiometry results as applied to Jupiter’s atmosphere and radiation belts. Data analysis of plasma, energetic particle, and radio and plasma wave observations. Oversees and participates in overall Education/Public Outreach (E/PO) program.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dr. Scott Bolton has 24 years experience at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), spanning a wide spectrum of management, engineering and scientific positions for planetary missions including Cassini, Galileo, DS-1, Voyager, Magellan, Quasat, Solar Probe, and CRAF. His extensive experience managing multiple science investigations on both Cassini and Galileo provides an excellent background and skill set for his role as the Juno PI.

    His experience at JPL spans mission design, instrument design and delivery, mission development, science planning, and science operations.

    Dr. Bolton’s management experience includes leading groups of scientists on Galileo, Cassini, his research group at JPL, and management of a team of engineers for Galileo operations.

    In 2004 he became the Director of Space Sciences Department at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) where he manages the work of about 90 scientists and engineers.

    Dr. Bolton led the concept development for the Juno microwave radiometer experiment and has research expertise in multiple areas relevant to the Juno mission (microwave radio astronomy, radiation belts, magnetospheric physics, and atmospheric science).

    Since 1999, Dr. Bolton has served as Chair of the Cassini Titan Orbiter Science Team, responsible for developing the multi-disciplinary investigation of Titan. From 1987-1997, Dr. Bolton managed the JPL and instrument teams associated with the Galileo Magnetospheric Working Group. This group was responsible for the definition of Galileo’s “low rate” mission and the planning and management of the fields and particles payload.

    Dr. Bolton served as JPL scientist for the PEPE experiment on DS-1 with responsibility for the successful development of the instrument. From 1980-1986, Dr. Bolton worked in the Mission Design and Mission Planning Groups at JPL on advanced mission concepts.

    Dr. Bolton received his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from University of Michigan in 1980, and a Ph.D. in Astrophysics from U.C. Berkeley in 1990. He received the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal in 2002; JPL Individual Awards for Exceptional Excellence in Leadership in 2002, 2001, and 1996, and Excellence in Management in 2000; he has also received seven NASA Group Achievement Awards.

    Dr. Bolton is Co-Investigator on two Galileo experiments, Plasma Wave Subsystem (PWS) and Plasma Subsystem (PLS), and two Cassini investigations, Cassini Plasma Subsystem (CAPS) and Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI). He is also the Investigation Scientist for the Radio and Plasma Wave Subsystem (RPWS).

    Dr. Bolton has been Principal Investigator on NASA Space Physics and Planetary Astronomy programs since 1988. He presently leads an international research group focused on modeling Jupiter and Saturn’s radiation belts. He is an author of over 60 scientific papers in the refereed literature.

IN HONOR OF:

Angioletta Coradini
Mario AcuÑa
Richard Grammier
Michael Klein
Dave Slater

CO-INVESTIGATORS

  • Michael
    Allison

    NASA’s Goddard Space Space Flight Center (GSFC) - Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS)


    JUNO ROLE

    Provides interpretation and modeling of retrieved vertical and horizontal distribution of temperature and water abundance in Jupiter’s deep atmosphere in terms of the planet’s circulation and dynamics. Assists in the planning of radiometric scan sequences. Collaborates with other team members on the related atmospheric dynamical interpretation of gravitational sounding data. Supports the Education/Public Outreach (E/PO) program through university teaching, student mentoring, and popular lectures. 

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Michael Allison’s research centers on planetary atmospheric dynamics, with a special focus on outer planet circulations and meteorology. He has led several studies of the dynamical interpretation of infrared, radio, and imaging data on the Jovian atmospheres. Allison’s key contributions include the wave dynamical analysis of radio occultation profiles and Galileo probe Doppler measurements as signatures of the deep stratification of Jupiter’s atmosphere, the first identification of the Saturn polar hexagon as a stationary Rossby wave, and the potential vorticity modeling of a latitudinally variable thermocline for the Jovian circulation.

    Allison was the organizing Chairman of the Conference on the Jovian Atmospheres, convened at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and co-editor of its proceedings (NASA CP-2441).

    He presently serves as Co-Investigator on the Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment and a team member on the Cassini RADAR investigation for work on Saturn microwave radiometry.

    Allison is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Astronomy at Columbia University where he teaches advanced level courses in planetary dynamics.

  • John 
    Anderson

    California Institute of Technology


    JUNO ROLE

    Interpretation of the measured gravity and magnetic fields of Jupiter, with particular emphasis on the magnetic field spectrum and its possible relationship to the gravity field. The magnetic field spectrum may tell us about the conductivity structure (and thus state of matter) within Jupiter, the nature of zonal flows within Jupiter, and the nature of convective transport and beat flow. Secondarily, one of the team members who works on the “big picture”: The relationship between the observed properties of Jupiter and the formation and evolution of the planet and giant planets in general.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Ph. D. thesis on the interior of Jupiter. Central role, along with E. E. Salpeter in the idea that the gas giant planets are undergoing continuous differentiation (rain-out of helium and neon), apparently confirmed by Galileo. Long-term involvement in research on the nature of the deep interior of Jupiter, with particular emphasis on the nature of the magnetic field, its generation and the impact it may have on the wind structure of the planet. Participant in numerous NASA committees concerned with the strategy and implementation of solar system exploration. Wide ranging research effort in planetary science (including Earth), recognized through numerous awards, including Urey Prize (DPS), Hess Medal (AGU) and Fellow of the Royal Society (London). President of the Planetary Science Section of AGU. PI of an unsuccessful Discovery-class proposal (Quicksilver, a mission to Mercury) and team member of the almost successful Discovery-class proposal for an orbiter to Jupiter (INSIDE Jupiter).

  • Sushil 
    Atreya

    Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan


    JUNO ROLE

    Plans, designs, and sequences Jupiter water and ammonia observations with the Microwave Radiometer (MWR) System. Develops the required thermo-chemical-condensation models appropriate to the geometry of observations. Performs reduction and analysis of data to determine the distribution of water and ammonia on Jupiter. Combines the MWR results with infrared observations made by JIRAM on Juno to provide meteorological context for composition. Assists the science team on the interpretation of data with the goal of understanding the formation of Jupiter and the origin and evolution of its atmosphere.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    For nearly three decades, Sushil Atreya has been actively engaged in planetary science research. Most of his research has been on the physical and chemical processes, cloud physics, thermo-chemistry, and the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of the giant planets and Titan. He has also studied the other planets, particularly Mars, using the methodology, tools, and the coupled thermochemistry-photochemistry-radiative transfer models he developed for the giant planetary systems.

    Sushil Atreya has published 140 refereed research articles, written ten chapters in various publications and is the author of a graduate level textbook detailing the atmospheres and ionospheres of the giant planets. He is also editor of a book on the origin and evolution of planetary atmospheres.

    Since 1974, Sushil Atreya has worked at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he is presently Professor of Atmospheric and Space Science. He has held visiting professorships at the University of Paris, France, in 1984-1985, 2000, and 2001.

    Sushil Atreya is currently participating as Co-Investigator and member of the science and experiment team on the Cassini-Huygens (GeMS and ACP) and the Mars Express (PFS) missions. Previously he was a Co-Investigor on the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer, Voyager 1 and 2 UV Spectrometers, and the Phobos (at Mars) Spectro-photometer Investigations.

    Atreya has participated frequently in planetary observations from the Earth, particularly those with the HST, CFHT, VLT, and ISO.

  • Fran
    Bagenal

    University of Colorado, Boulder


    JUNO ROLE: SPACE PHYSICS.

    Chairs magnetospheres working group, analyzes fields and particles data, auroral images; interdisciplinary role integrating in situ and remote sensing OBS.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Fran Bagenal is editor of “Jupiter: The Planet, Satellite and Magnetosphere,” which summarizes the post-Galileo science of the Jovian system. Her research has focused on the Io plasma torus and the magnetosphere of Jupiter. She has participated in the Voyager mission, was an Interdisciplinary Scientist on Galileo and is collaborating with the Cassini UVIS team on analysis of data obtained at the Jupiter flyby.

    Bagenal is team leader of the plasma investigation on the New Horizons mission to Pluto. She is a Co-Investigator on the Jupiter Magnetospheric Explorer mission (under Phase A study).

  • Michel
    Blanc

    Centre d’Etudes Spatiales des Rayonnements


    JUNO ROLE

    Michel Blanc will contribute to the multi-instrument study of the Jovian polar magnetosphere. In addition to data analysis, he will develop models of thermosphere/ionosphere/ magnetosphere coupling adapted to the polar upper atmosphere of Jupiter, taking account of the three types of auroras and of the corresponding momentum and energy transfer to the atmosphere implied by them. He will work in close collaboration with the other modelers of the team to build a fully self-consistent model of this coupling. Emphasis will be on the rotational/energetic coupling between Jupiter’s atmosphere and the Jovian dust/gas/plasma nebula and its connection with the broader theme of disk/central body electrodynamic coupling in astrophysical disks.

     

    Michel Blanc will take advantage of his IDS role on the Cassini mission to develop a comparative study of the polar magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, making full use of the intense phase of 3-D exploration of Saturn’s magnetosphere on high-inclination orbits planned for the Cassini mission during from years 2006-2009.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Michel Blanc is active in theory and modeling of plasma transport and large scale plasma circulation in planetary magnetospheres and ionospheres. He contributes to the data analysis of space missions. Blanc has worked on various aspects of magnetospheric plasma transport including large-scale general circulation models for planetary magnetospheres and all the effects of ionosphere/ magnetosphere coupling in auroral regions: precipitations, field-aligned electric current closure, modification of ionospheric conductivities, effects on neutral thermospheric motions and feed-back on the ionosphere; 3-D and 4-D diffusion models of planetary radiation belts developed for Earth and applied to Saturn; theory of the interchange instability in fast rotating magnetospheres, applications to radial plasma transport.

     

    He is currently an IDS on the Cassini/Huygens mission and co-chair of the Magnetosphere and Plasmas (MAPS) working group. His interdisciplinary investigation focuses on ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling at Saturn, large-scale morphology and dynamics of the Kronian plasma populations, and on the interaction of Saturn’s magnetosphere with its satellites, rings and neutral/ion tori.

     

    Blanc plays an active role in the coordination of magnetospheric science activities on this mission and develops data analysis, visualization and dissemination tools to help maximize science return.

     

    Michel Blanc was appointed chairman of the Space Research and Exploration Evaluation Committee of CNES, the French space agency, in 2003.

  • Jeremy
    Bloxham

    Harvard University


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Co-Investigator. Jeremy Bloxham’s role involves investigation of Jupiter’s main magnetic field, from initial mission simulation through to analysis and interpretation of mission data.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Jeremy Bloxham has 20 years experience in the analysis and interpretation of satellite magnetic field observations for Earth, Uranus, Neptune and Mercury. His recent work combines these observational studies with numerical modeling of the dynamo process.

    Recent highlights of his work (in conjunction with graduate students and other collaborators) include a numerical dynamo model operating in a quasi-Taylor state; an explanation of abrupt changes in the Earth’s magnetic field; and a demonstration of the importance of the geometry of the convective region in determining the morphology of a planet’s magnetic field (of particular importance for Uranus and Neptune) and the strength of a planet’s magnetic field (of particular importance for Mercury). His work with a graduate student on how to treat attitude errors in spacecraft magnetometer measurements has greatly enhanced the quality of models derived from orsted observations.

  • John
    Connerney

    NASA’s Goddard Space Space Flight Center (GSFC) - Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Staff Scientists and Deputy Principal Investigator. Leads magnetic field investigation; responsible for design, fabrication, calibration and delivery of flux gate magnetometer; Oversees s/c magnetic cleanliness; data reduction, analysis and data archiving of magnetic field data.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dr. Connerney’s primary interests are in instrumentation and techniques for magnetic field measurement and the study of the outer planets. Since joining GSFC in 1979, he has participated in and led space magnetic field investigations and studies of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. He has used remote sensing and in situ observations to develop techniques for measurement, analysis, and modeling of planetary magnetic fields. Among his more than 75 refereed publications on planetary magnetic fields, geophysical inverse theory, radio emissions, ionospheres, aurorae, and the electrodynamic interaction of satellites and ring systems with a planetary magnetic field, over 25 papers focus on the Jovian system.

    Studies of the Jovian magnetosphere. Developed an empirical model of the Jovian current sheet and inner magnetosphere; developed the generalized inverse method for analysis of planetary magnetic fields and applied it to Jovian magnetic field; developed a self-consistent MHD model of the Jovian magnetosphere; modeled UV aurora and Jovian decametric radio emission; studied the H3+ IR aurorae; and discovered H3+ emission at the foot of the Io Flux Tube.

    Co-Investigator on Voyager 1 and 2, Tethered Satellite, and Mars Observer and Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer investigations; PI or Co-Investigator on observing programs with the Hubble Space Telescope and NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility for planetary imaging and spectroscopy.

    Data Processing Manager for Mars Global Surveyor, supervising daily operations and acting as Deputy PI; developed methods to analyze and mitigate spacecraft magnetic fields; helped design magnetometer instrumentation; led international collaborative research projects; and is an experienced public outreach communicator whose work has often been described in the media.

  • Stanley
    Cowley

    University of Leicester, United Kingdom


    JUNO ROLE

    Data analysis, modeling and theory relevant to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in Jupiter’s plasma environment; origins of jovian auroral emissions.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Analysis of jovian magnetic field and plasma particle data from Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, and Galileo space missions. Analysis of Jovian auroral data from Hubble Space Telescope. Modeling and theory of magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions in the Jovian system, and their relation to the origins of Jovian auroral emissions.

  • Eric
    Dejong

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory


    JUNO ROLE

    Eric De Jong is a member of the JUNO science team and the Principal Investigator of the Solar System Visualization (SSV) project. He is responsible for the science visualization of JUNO science results and mission plans. He and his SSV team will develop science visualization, data analysis, and data distribution products technology and infrastructure for the JUNO team. As a JUNO Co-Investigator Dr. De Jong will compare JUNO observations with physics based models and visualize the three dimensional (3D) interior structure of the Sun.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO:

    Dr. Eric M. De Jong is a Planetary Scientist working in the Science Division of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a Visiting Associate in Planetary Science at Caltech. He is the Chief Scientist for JPL’s Instrument Software and Science Data Systems Section; and the Research Director for JPL’s: Visualization and Image Processing (VIP) Center, Image Processing Laboratory (IPL), and Digital Image Animation Laboratory (DIAL). For the last three decades his research has focused on the scientific visualization of the Sun; planetary surfaces, atmospheres, magnetospheres; and the evolution and dynamics of stars, galaxies and planetary systems. As the Principal Investigator for NASA’s Solar System Visualization (SSV) Project he leads a team of technologists and scientists responsible for developing new science visualization products infrastructure and technology. Dr. De Jong and his team create images, maps, models and movies from NASA Space &Earth Science remotely sensed data. These products highlight new discoveries and mission plans.

    The SSV team produced most of the animations for the following missions: Juno, Phoenix,Mars Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), Mars Polar Lander (MPL), Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter(LRO), Magellan, Galileo, Ulysses, Voyager, TOPEX / Poseidon, SIR-C and the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM). Eric also participates as a scientific investigator analyzing observations from these missions. SSV images have been used on the covers of every major magazine. SSV animations are regularly shown on national television. SSV has pioneered the use of stereo HDTV, IMAX, and digital cinema technology for the visualization of planetary surfaces and atmospheres. Eric and his team have created planetary image and animation sequences for the IMAX films “Blue Planet”, “Journey to the Planets”, “Destiny in Space”, “The Discoverers”, “L5: First City in Space.” “ Cosmic Voyage: “Roving Mars” and “3D Sun.” Eric is the Principal Investigator for NASA’s Virtual Presence at Earth and in Space (VPS) and Museum Server (MUSE) projects. The SSV team developed NASA’s Planetary Photo-journal in collaboration with the Planetary Data System (PDS) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The Photo-journal website is: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov.

  • Daniel
    Gautier

    Laboratoire d’etudes spatiales et d’instrumentation en astrophysique (LESIA)


    JUNO ROLE

    Develops proto-solar nebula and planetary formation models. Models the trapping of volatiles in the nebulae, giant planets, and comets.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO:

    Daniel Gautier was Co-Investigator of the Voyager mission to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune as part of the IRIS team. He was IDS of the Cassini-Huygens mission. He also participated as Co-investigator of Cassini-Huygens in the CIRS experiment aboard the Cassini orbiter and of the GCMS aboard the Huygens probe.

  • Randy
    Gladstone

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Leader of design and development and scientific analysis of data from the ALICE UV spectrographic imager. Will support mission Education/Public Outreach (E/PO) through popular lectures and student mentoring.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Institute Scientist at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, TX. Specializes in radiative transfer and the study of upper atmospheres. Ph.D. thesis from Caltech in 1983 on Jupiter’s upper atmosphere (Advisor: Prof. Y.L. Yung).

    Atmospheres Theme Leader on the New Horizons Mission. Over 80 technical papers published in refereed journals, on subjects including the Sun, Earth, Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, Triton, Pluto, and the primitive solar system.

  • Tristan
    Guillot

    Observatoire de la Cote D’Azur (OCA)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Link gravity field measurement to interior models of Jupiter. Infer core mass and total mass of heavy elements in the planet. Analyze consequences for formation theories.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Tristan Guillot creates numerical modeling of the internal structure and evolution of giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn and extrasolar planets. He informs on the evolution of disks and planet formation, as well as condensation in the atmospheres of substellar objects.

    Guillot is a member of the scientific council and Co-Investigator of the COROT mission (CNES).

    He was awarded the bronze medal of the CNRS in 2002.

  • Samuel
    Gulkis

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Leads the microwave retrieval analysis, development of algorithms, and data interpretation to yield abundances. Assists with modeling of Jupiter’s synchrotron emission. Will participate in Education/Public Outreach activities.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dr. Gulkis received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Florida, Gainesville. He has over thirty years of research experience in radio and submillimeter astronomy. His principal areas of research have included Jovian magnetospheric physics, the major planet atmospheres, and experimsental (cosmic microwave background) cosmology. He has served as Co-Investigator on two previous space experiments (Voyager and COBE), and is the Principal Investigator of the ESA MIRO-ROSETTA investigation, scheduled for launch in February 2004. Dr. Gulkis’ current scientific interests are in the physics of small solar systems bodies and planetary atmospheres. He has served on numerous NASA Advisory Committees on Planetary and Space Astronomy, and has served on the Icarus Board of Editors. He received two NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Awards, one for work on Outer Planet Atmosphere Models, the other for work on Observational Cosmology. He was appointed Senior Research Scientist at JPL in 1981. An abbreviated bibliography of relevant publications follows. He has published more than 100 refereed scientific research articles.

  • Douglas
    Hamilton

    University of Maryland


    JUNO ROLE

    Co-Investigator. Investigates Jupiter’s tenuous ring system with numerical simulations prior to launch and with Juno’s instrumentation subsequently. Collaborates with the various instrument teams and working groups to determine properties important for Jupiter’s dusty rings including local plasma characteristics, the magnetic field configuration and any impacts of dusty debris. Will participate in an optical search for Jupiter’s rings.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Doug Hamilton is a dynamicist whose scientific interests focus on rings and satellites in the Solar System. He is a leader in the non-gravitational dynamics affecting tiny dust grains in ring systems and a co-discoverer of Saturn’s large Phoebe ring in 2009. Hamilton also investigates the detailed dynamics affecting planets and satellites, including tidal and resonant effects.

    Key awards include the DPS Harold C. Urey Prize (1999), U. Maryland Board of Regent’s Faculty Award for Scholarship (2010), and the Dean’s Award for Excellent in Teaching (1997, 2008).

  • Candice
    Hansen

    Planetary Science Institute (PSI)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Co-Investigator, responsible for JunoCam, co-Chair of Science Planning Working Group.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Candice Hansen-Koharcheck earned a Bachelor of Science in Physics from California State University, Fullerton, in 1976. The next year, she began work at JPL, joining the Voyager Imaging Team as assistant experiment representative. Her task was to design the camera image acquisition sequences for every satellite flyby that occurred during Voyagers’ encounters with Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

    The Voyager encounters provided milestones marking many events in her life. From 1981 to 1984, the long cruise period between the Saturn and Uranus encounters, she worked at the German Space Operations Center in Oberpfaffenhofen. She worked on the Ion Release Module, the German portion of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorer, a multinational Earth orbiting mission designed to study the Earth’s magnetosphere.

    After Voyager’s Uranus flyby she returned to graduate school at UCLA in 1987. In 1989, in the midst of preparing for the Neptune encounter, she finished her Master of Science in planetary physics and in 1994 completed her doctorate in Earth and Space Science, also at UCLA. Her dissertation included a thermal model of Triton’s nitrogen frost and atmosphere, based on data acquired by Voyager during the 1989 Neptune encounter. She has also applied the thermal model to Pluto and other Kuiper Belt Objects.

    In 1990, Dr. Hansen began working on the Cassini mission to Saturn with the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) investigation team, responsible for planning and analyzing icy satellite data. She is still a UVIS Co-Investigator as the Cassini project executes its extended mission phase. Her current research activity is studying Enceladus’ water vapor plume.

    Dr. Hansen is also currently the Deputy Principal Investigator for the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Her area of interest is studying the seasonal CO2 polar cap of Mars. She continues to pursue that interest as a Co-Investigator on the High resolution Stereo and Color Imager (HiSCI) being built to fly on the Mars Trace Gas Orbiter that will launch in 2016.

    As a Co-Investigator on the Juno mission to Jupiter, launching in 2011, Dr. Hansen is responsible for the development and operation of the JunoCam outreach camera that will engage the public in planning images of Jupiter.

    Dr. Hansen retired from JPL in 2010 but continues in all her endeavors under the auspices of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson.

  • William
    Hubbard

    Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Interpret Jovian gravitational and magnetic field data through comparison with models of interior structure and dynamics, together with expected Jovian response to rotation and tidal perturbations, with a primary objective of characterizing the large-scale dynamics of the interior and setting constraints on the mass of a dense Jovian core.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Hubbard’s research focuses on studies of the structure and evolution of Jupiter, Saturn, and extrasolar giant planets. Originally a Co-Investigator with the proposed INSIDE Jupiter orbiter and now a Juno Co-Investigator, Hubbard showed how high-precision gravity data from a close-range orbiter of Jupiter can be used to determine the depths to which Jupiter’s extraordinary zonal wind patterns penetrate. Hubbard contributed to the 2013-2022 Planetary Sciences Decadal Survey of the US National Research Council as a member of the Giant Planet Panel. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

    He was awarded the 2005 Gerard P. Kuiper Prize in Planetary Sciences by the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society.

  • Andrew
    Ingersoll

    California Institute of Technology


    JUNO ROLE

    Dr. Andrew Ingersoll is Chair of the Atmosphere Working Group for the JUNO mission. He will lead in the investigations of meteorology, dynamics, winds, and composition using microwave, IR/UV, and gravity data. Ingersoll will develop atmospheric dynamics models, including moist convection, upwelling and downwelling, and the distribution of water and ammonia to the 100 bar level. He will participate in the reduction of microwave radiometer data.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dr. Ingersoll has published models of moist convection on Jupiter, deep convection in giant planet interiors, and dynamics of the Great Red Spot. He has participated in planning and analysis of data from outer planet spacecraft including Pioneer Jupiter/Saturn, Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini.

    He participated in analysis of Hubble Space Telescope observations of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts.

    He received NASA’s Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal for his work on Voyager.

  • Michael
    Janssen

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Leads the Microwave Radiometer Investigation and is responsible for the MWR (Microwave Radiometer) instrument operation, data reduction and analysis, data archiving, and publication of the results.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dr. Michael Janssen has over forty years of experience in radio astronomy and has specialized in the microwave remote sensing of the Earth and other Solar System objects, observational astrophysics and cosmology, and the development and application of microwave instrumentation for astrophysics and remote sensing.

    In his early years he played leading roles in the development of the world’s first millimeter wavelength radio interferometers, and subsequently participated as Co-Investigator or Principal Investigator in a number of space-borne microwave experiments.

    Janssen was a member of the Science Working Group for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and played a major role in implementing the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer experiment on COBE that discovered the origin of structure in the universe. In the same period he edited and made significant contributions to a book on the microwave remote sensing of atmospheres that is widely used in the field.

    At present, in addition to ongoing participation in the Planck and Rosetta missions, Janssen is now focusing on his flight involvements as lead for the Cassini RADAR radiometer, now in orbit around Saturn, and as lead for the Juno Microwave Radiometer.

  • William
    Kurth

    University of Iowa


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Lead Co-Investigator for the Waves Investigation. Responsible for design, fabrication, calibration and delivery of the Waves instrument; leads analysis of Waves data and responsible for delivery of Waves data to the PDS; serves as Mission Archive Scientist for the JUNO mission; will contribute to Education/Public Outreach mission (E/PO) activities.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    William S. Kurth is a Research Scientist in the Dept. of Physics &Astronomy at the University of Iowa where he has been a member of the Radio and Plasma Wave group since 1979, upon the completion of his Ph.D. in Physics in the same group. His research focuses on plasma waves in space plasmas in planetary magnetospheres and the solar wind as well as solar system radio astronomy. He has done extensive work on electron cyclotron harmonic emissions at Earth and each of the gas giant planets. He has studied auroral kilometric radiation at Earth and non-thermal radio emissions at Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. He discovered low-frequency heliospheric radio emissions now thought to be generated near the heliopause.

    Dr. Kurth is Deputy Principal Investigator for the RPWS instrument on Cassini and a Co-Investigator on the wave investigations on Voyager, Galileo, and Polar. Previously he was the Project Scientist for the Plasma Diagnostics Package which flew as part of Spacelab 2. Dr. Kurth was Project Manager for an instrument development for Solar Polar until that project was cancelled by NASA. He was a member of the Planetary Science Data Steering Group that developed the concept for today’s Planetary Data System and served as the Project Scientist for the PDS between 1987 and 1989. He is currently the manager of the Outer Planets Subnode of the Planetary Plasma Interactions Node of the PDS. He was the Chair of the Data Working Group for Galileo. Dr. Kurth has served on COMPLEX (1991-1993), was a member of the Space Physics Sub-committee of NASA’s Space Science Advisory Committee (1992-1995), the CSSP Decadal Study - Solar Wind-Magnetospheric Interactions Panel (2001), and the Sun-Earth Connections Roadmap Committee (2002). Currently he is a member of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter SDT.

    He was an Associate Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research (1997-2001). Dr. Kurth has published more than 175 papers in refereed journals and more than 60 in other publications.

  • Steven
    Levin

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    As Project Scientist, serves as representative of the Principal Investigator (PI) in day-to-day activities, maintains cognizance of all aspects of the mission in interactions with the Project Manager and the project team, participates in daily decisions as delegated by the PI. As MWR Co-Investigator, leads the radiometer data reduction and analysis, including instrument calibration as well as modeling and subtraction of Jupiter’s synchrotron radiation and other backgrounds. Assists with radiometer definition and development.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    20 years experience in both development and operations of numerous ground-based, balloon-borne, and space-based astrophysics and planetary missions. Research includes modeling of Jovian synchrotron emission and inner radiation belts. Has built and used radiometers to observe astronomical objects ranging from the Cosmic Microwave Background to cold molecular clouds, from observation platforms which include mountaintops in California, the South Pole, and spacecraft.

  • Jonathan
    Lunine

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Jonathan Lunine is an expert on the formation and evolution of giant planets and their satellites, extrasolar giant planets and brown dwarfs. He will apply his expertise to ensuring that the science goals in the areas of formation and evolution are met during development, and will participate in the analysis of the data to derive water and ammonia abundances, as well as the interpretation of the data in terms of cosmogony.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Theoretical modeling, mission involvement ranging from Voyager through Cassini, SIRTF, JWST. Over 160 publications.

  • Barry
    Mauk

    Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Lead Investigator on the Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI). Establishes science and measurement requirements for the JEDI and represents JEDI to the Juno Project and to NASA. Responsible for delivery of the JEDI instrument and completion of the JEDI investigation. Responsible for the operation of the JEDI instrument and for the science analysis of the JEDI data.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dr. Barry H. Mauk is supervisor of the Space Physics Group at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). He has studied planetary space environments called magnetospheres since the early 1970’s, beginning with the Earth’s magnetosphere and then expanding into the magnetospheres of the gas giant magnetospheres (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) as Co-Investigator on NASA’s Voyager and Cassini missions and as team member on the NASA’s Galileo orbital mission to Jupiter.

    Mauk is presently lead investigator on the Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) on NASA’s Juno Jupiter polar orbiting mission, lead investigator on the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) instrument suite on NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) to study a key space environment process called “magnetic reconnection,” and Project Scientist on NASA’s Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission to study the Earth’s dynamic radiation belts.

    Recent achievements include the discovery of a massive gas torus associated with Jupiter’s enigmatic moon Euorpa, the discovery that Earth-like energetic particle injections at Jupiter and Saturn that give rise to transients within the northern and southern lights, and his identification of key similarities and differences in the processes that control the radiation belts of all of the strongly magnetized planets of the solar system.

    Dr. Mauk received his PhD in 1978 from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) under the tutelage of Professor Carl E. McIlwain, a key member of the team that discovered Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts. He then worked at the University of Washington in Seattle on a scientific ballooning program to the study the high energy component of the particles that cause Earth’s northern lights. He moved to JHU/APL in 1982.

  • David
    McComas

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Co-Investigator; JADE Instrument Principal Investigator (PI).

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    David J. McComas is Assistant Vice President of the Space Science and Engineering Division at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas (SwRI). He is also an Adjoint Professor in the joint University of Texas, San Antonio - Southwest Research Institute (PhD &MS) graduate program in Physics, which he helped to establish in 2004.

    From 1998 through 2000, Dr. McComas served as the founding Director of the Center for Space Science and Exploration (CSSE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He was concurrently the NASA Program Manager at Los Alamos and served as the Group Leader for Space and Atmospheric Sciences (NIS-1) from 1992-1998. Dr. McComas received his B.S. Degree in Physics from MIT in 1980 and Ph.D. in Geophysics and Space Physics from UCLA in 1986.

    Dr. McComas is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He was honored with the AGU’s prestigious James B. Macelwane Award for outstanding young scientists in 1993, received Distinguished Performance Awards from Los Alamos in 1989, 1990, and 1995, as well as numerous NASA, Los Alamos and other achievement awards.

    Dr. McComas is the Principal Investigator for NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Mission, the Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) Explorer Mission-of-Opportunity, the Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (ISIS) on Solar Probe Plus and the Ulysses Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun (SWOOPS) Experiment; he is also the lead Co-Investigator for the Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), the solar wind analyzer for the New Horizons mission to Pluto (SWAP), and the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE) on the Juno spacecraft that will orbit over Jupiter’s poles.

    Prior to moving to Southwest, he was the Principal Investigator for DOE’s series of 10 Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer (MPA) instruments at geosynchronous orbit. Dr. McComas is Co-Investigator on NASA’s Medium Energy Neutral Atom (MENA) instrument on the IMAGE Midsized Explorer, the plasma instrument for the Cassini mission to Saturn (CAPS), the GENESIS Discovery mission, ISTP Polar spacecraft’s Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE), the Cluster plasma electron instrument (PEACE), and is a team member on the New Millennium Plasma Experiment for Planetary Exploration (PEPE).

    Dr. McComas currently serves on the NASA Advisory Council (NAC) Science Committee and has previously served on numerous committees and panels for NASA, AGU, the National Academy of Science’s National Research Council, the University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the State of New Mexico. This service included chairing NASA’s Sun-Earth Connections Advisory Subcommittee (SECAS) and Solar Probe and Solar Probe Plus Science and Technology Definition Teams, as well as serving as a member of NASA’s Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC) and on the ESA/NASA Solar Orbiter Science Definition Team.

    Dr. McComas has invented a variety of instruments and missions for space applications and holds six patents. He is an author of over 400 scientific papers in the refereed literature spanning topics in heliospheric, magnetospheric, solar, and planetary science as well as space instrument and mission development (see Publication List). These papers have generated over 10,000 citations, with h=54 (ISI Web of Knowledge citation database).

  • Glenn
    Orton

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Coordinate Juno microwave, near-infrared and visible results with each other and with Earth-based observations of Jupiter’s atmosphere.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Glenn has 35 years of experience in acquiring and analyzing both Earth-based and spacecraft observations of the outer planets, beginning in the early 1970’s with ground-based support for the Pioneer 10 and 11 flyby spacecraft to create a coordinated model of Jupiter’s atmosphere. Years of observations paved the way for the discovery of Jupiter’s “quasi-quadrennial oscillation” wave structure. He has led observational teams that characterized the nature and influence of external impacts in Jupiter’s atmosphere in 1994, 2009 and 2010. He coordinated observations that led to the determination that the Galileo Probe that descended into Jupiter’s atmosphere in 1995 sampled one of the driest places in the detectable atmosphere, leading scientists to assess the need for determining the distribution of water across the planet and providing one of the key motivations of the Juno mission. He also coordinated observations that provided support for the Galileo Orbiter (remote-sensing) mission, and the Cassini Jupiter flyby. He is the author or co-author of over 160 articles in the open scientific literature.

  • Tobias
    Owen

    University of Hawaii


    JUNO ROLE

    Chairs Origins Working Group: Responsible for interpretation of abundances to constrain models for the formation of the solar nebula, icy planetesimals and planets, relationships to comets and inner planet atmospheres.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Tobias Owen studies the origin and composition of planetary atmospheres and comets, using ground-based telescopes and spectrometers as well as experiments carried on deep-space missions. With Akiva Bar-Nun, he has developed a model for the contribution of comets to atmospheres of both inner and outer planets, based on laboratory studies of the formation of amorphous ice and observations of elemental abundances and isotope ratios in cometary comas and planetary atmospheres. This model accounts for the deficiency of nitrogen in comets; it has also been useful in interpreting the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer results on the composition of Jupiter’s atmosphere.

    Toby was a member of the Lander Molecular Analysis Team on the Viking Mission to Mars with responsibility for atmospheric analysis. He has studied the atmospheres of the outer planets and Titan in the following capacities: Member of the Voyager Imaging Team; Interdisciplinary Scientist (IDS) and member of Probe Mass Spectrometer Team on Galileo Mission, IDS and member of Probe GCMS, Consolidated Infrared Spectrometer, Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyzer Teams for Cassini-Huygens Mission.

    American chair of Joint NASA-ESA Study Team that developed the Cassini-Huygens Mission.

  • Michael
    Ravine

    Malin Space Science Systems


    JUNO ROLE

    Leads the Junocam hardware development and contributes to imaging related E/PO activities. Will participate in science data analysis.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Instrument Manager, ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, Mars Atmospheric Global Imaging Experiment (MAGIE) (2010-present).

    Instrument Manager: Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (2005-2006) Juno Jupiter Orbiter Juno Camera (Junocam) (2005-present) Mars Science Laboratory Mars Descent Imager (2004-present) Mars Science Laboratory Mastcam (2004-present) Mars Science Laboratory Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) (2004-present) Mars Phoenix Lander Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) (2003-2007) Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mars Color Imager (MARCI) (2001-present) Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Camera (CTX) (2001-present) Mars Surveyor 2001 Lander Mars Descent Imager (MARDI ‘01) (1998-2000) Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) Visible Imaging Subsystem (VIS) (1998-1999)

    Principal Investigator: Freefall Interferometric Gravity Gradiometer (2001-2004) Semi-autonomous Rover Operations (2004-2008)

    Payload Manager, L1: Return to Apollo (2000-2001)

    Deputy Instrument Manager: Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter Camera (MOC2) (1994-1996) Mars Observer Camera (MOC) (1986-1992)

    Research Analyst, Voyager Imaging System (ISS) and Photopolarimeter (PPS) (1985-1986)

  • Dave
    Sheppard

    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) - Planetary Magnetospheres Laboratory


    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) Instrument Engineer. Member of the fluxgate electronics design, development and integration team.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dave Sheppard has worked as an electrical engineer assigned to the Science directorate at GSFC for more than 20 years and on approximately a dozen satellite instruments.

    In 2007, after 19 years with the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics, Sheppard joined Planetary Magnetospheres to work on fluxgate magnetometers for Juno, Ares, RBSP, MAVEN, and Solar Probe Plus.

  • Ed
    Smith

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Magnetic field investigation. Oversee development of Scalar Helium Magnetometer, its integration onto the spacecraft and in-flight performance. Participate in the reduction and analysis of the data returned.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Principal Investigator of over a dozen space-flight investigations. Provided Vector Helium Magnetometers for Mariner 4, 5, Pioneer 10, 11, ISEE-3/ICE and Ulysses. Supplied the Vector/Scalar Helium Magnetometer for Cassini and Dual Scalar Helium Magnetometer for Argentine-US satellite, SAC-Co.

  • Paul
    Steffes

    Georgia Institution of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering


    JUNO ROLE

    Conducts laboratory measurements with students, of the microwave absorption properties of water vapor, ammonia, and aqueous ammonia under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmosphere to enable proper planning of observations and interpretation of data from the JUNO/MWR experiment.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    For 31 years, Professor Paul Steffes has worked directly in conducting laboratory measurements to support microwave remote sensing of planetary atmospheres. Over the past 27 years, his laboratory has become a world leader in the laboratory measurement of the microwave and millimeter-wave properties of simulated planetary atmospheres.

    In January 2004, he was named a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), “for contributions to the understanding of planetary atmospheres.”

  • David
    Stevenson

    California Institute of Technology


    JUNO ROLE

    Interpretation of the measured gravity and magnetic fields of Jupiter, with particular emphasis on the magnetic field spectrum and its possible relationship to the gravity field. The magnetic field spectrum may tell us about the conductivity structure (and thus state of matter) within Jupiter, the nature of zonal flows within Jupiter, and the nature of convective transport and beat flow. Secondarily, one of the team members who works on the “big picture”: The relationship between the observed properties of Jupiter and the formation and evolution of the planet and giant planets in general.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Ph. D. thesis on the interior of Jupiter. Central role, along with E. E. Salpeter in the idea that the gas giant planets are undergoing continuous differentiation (rain-out of helium and neon), apparently confirmed by Galileo. Long-term involvement in research on the nature of the deep interior of Jupiter, with particular emphasis on the nature of the magnetic field, its generation and the impact it may have on the wind structure of the planet. Participant in numerous NASA committees concerned with the strategy and implementation of solar system exploration. Wide ranging research effort in planetary science (including Earth), recognized through numerous awards, including Urey Prize (DPS), Hess Medal (AGU) and Fellow of the Royal Society (London). President of the Planetary Science Section of AGU. PI of an unsuccessful Discovery-class proposal (Quicksilver, a mission to Mercury) and team member of the almost successful Discovery-class proposal for an orbiter to Jupiter (INSIDE Jupiter).

  • Ed
    Stone

    California Institute of Technology


    JUNO ROLE

    Provide overall scientific and management advice to the Principal Investigator and participate in the analysis of data on the Jovian radiation environment.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Edward C. Stone is the David Morrisroe Professor of Physics at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and former Director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (1991-2001). He has served as Chair of Caltech’s Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy and oversaw the development of the Keck Observatory as Vice President for Astronomical Facilities.

    Since 1972, Stone has been the project scientist for the Voyager Mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, coordinating the scientific study of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Stone also coordinated Voyager’s continuing exploration of the outer heliosphere and search for the edge of interstellar space.

    Following his first instrument on a Discoverer satellite in 1961, Stone has been a principal investigator on eight NASA spacecraft and a Co-Investigator on five other NASA missions for which he developed instruments for studying galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and planetary magnetospheres. He is currently the PI for the Advanced Composition Explorer and the Cosmic ray Subsystems on Voyager 1 and 2 and is a Co-Investigator on the STEREO/IMPACT investigation.

    Stone is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, President of the International Academy of Astronautics, and a Vice President of COSPAR.

    Among his awards and honors, Stone received the National Medal of Science from President Bush (1991), the Magellanic Premium from the American Philosophical Society, and Distinguished Service Medals from NASA.

  • Richard
    Thorne

    University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)


    JUNO ROLE

    Magnetospheric Physics. Chair of the Juno Radiation Working Group. Analysis and theoretical interpretation of particle and field data from the magnetosphere physics instruments. Modeling of Jovian radiation belts and the mechanisms for auroral precipitation. Coupling processes between the ionosphere and magnetosphere.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Professor Richard Thorne has published over 250 research papers covering a wide range of topics in space plasma physics. He is a Fellow of American Geophysical Union (2000). His principal contributions are theoretical studies of the interactions between waves and particles in geophysical plasmas. His research has provided explanations for the origin of many different classes of plasma waves found in the highly tenuous solar system plasmas.

    He has developed quantitative theoretical codes to investigate wave-particle scattering in the radiation belts and employed them to explain the dominant acceleration and loss mechanisms for energetic radiation belt particles, and concomitant energy input to planetary upper atmospheres.

    As a member of the Galileo Energetic Particle Detector team (1976-2003), he has analyzed the role of wave-particle scattering on the structure of the Jovian radiation belts and the excitation of Jovian auroral emission. He has identified signatures for interchange instability in the Io torus and coupling processes between the magnetosphere and upper atmosphere of Jupiter. He is currently the theory lead and Co-Investigator on the energetic particle (RBSP-ECT) and plasma wave (EMFISIS) instrument teams for the Living With a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes mission to understand the dynamics of Earth’s radiation belts.


KEY PERSONNEL

  • Matthew
    Abrahamson

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Navigation Orbit Determination Analyst. The Juno Navigation OD team uses radiometric tracking data from the Deep Space Network (DSN) to solve for the Juno orbit state and projected trajectory.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Matt Abrahamson is currently a mission navigator in the Mission Design and Navigation Section at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA. Since starting work at JPL in August 2008, Matt has contributed to navigation trade studies in support of Constellation program and supported flight operations teams for EPOXI, Stardust-NEXT, and Juno. He has supported both autonomous navigation (AutoNav) and orbit determination teams in these roles.

    Matt received his S.B. degree in Aerospace Engineering With Information Technology from MIT in 2006, followed by an S.M. in Aeronautics and Astronautics as a Draper Fellow in 2008. During his two years at Draper Laboratory, Matt worked on concepts for autonomous deep space navigation and trajectory planning options for precision guided strike.

  • Doug
    Bernard

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Douglas Bernard is the Juno Project Systems Engineer.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    JPL: New Frontiers Program - Juno Project Systems Engineer, 10/04-present. - Lead of Project Systems Engineering Team during Juno Phase A activities JPL: Discovery Program - Comet Odyssey Acting Flight System Manager, 11/03-6/04. - Coordinated all aspects of Flight System design and cost during Step 1 proposal development JPL: Frequent member or chair of review boards and tiger teams, 96-present. - Including fault protection, entry descent and landing, landing hazard avoidance, system autonomy, flight system technology, star tracking, attitude control, and systems engineering investigations. JPL: Section Manager, Flight Systems, Section 313, 4/02-10/04; Deputy Section Manager, 4/00-4/02. - Managed the section responsible for systems engineering at the flight system and project systems level for JPL’s flight projects. Section responsibilities included concept formulation, system design, fault protection, ATLO and spacecraft team leadership in operations. JPL: Technical Group Supervisor/Principal, 9/96-4/00. - Flight Systems Engineering Group, Avionic Systems Engineering Section; Responsible for Avionics Systems Engineering (AACS and CDS) for JPL’s Implementation phase flight projects JPL: New Millennium Autonomy, 5/95-9/99. - DS1 Remote Agent Experiment Project Element Manager (‘95-’99); Led team through autonomy prototype then implementation and operation of remote agent experiment JPL: CogE, Cassini AACS Systems Engineering 3/90-10/95. - Cognizant Engineer of the AACS Systems Engineering task for the Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS). JPL: Attitude Control for Advanced Studies, 7/87-3/90 - Attitude Control Systems Engineer for Mars Rover Sample Return Development Flight Project, Solar Probe advanced study, Pluto Probe advanced study, and others. Hughes Aircraft Space and Communications Group: Staff/Senior Staff Engineer, 10/84-6/87 - Systems Engineer for dynamics: Mars Observer Proposal. - Leader: Hughes Anti-lock braking systems analysis study for GM. JPL: Galileo AACS Dynamics and Control Analyst, 9/78-9/80, 7/81-9/81 - Dynamics and control analyst for Galileo: dual spin dynamics analysis including wobble control, nutation damping specification, control algorithm design, control mode and task definition.

  • John
    Bordi

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Navigation Team Chief.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    John Bordi has been a member of the Juno Mission Design and Navigation team supporting project development since 2006. He has served as a navigation analyst on the NEAR and Cassini projects, leading the prime Orbit Determination teams during final approach to Saturn and during the Huygens probe release.

    John came to JPL in 1999 from UT Austin, where he completed his PhD research in orbit determination.

  • Michael 
    Davis

    Company Name


    JUNO ROLE

    UVS Instrument Scientist.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Michael Davis is an astrophysicist specializing in the design and testing of astronomical instruments. He has extensive experience integrating and testing UV instrumentation, including the Big Dog Planetary Rocket payload (NASA sounding rocket flights 36.201 UL and 36.210 UL) and the ALICE spectrograph for New Horizons.

    He is the Instrument Scientist for the Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE, NASA sounding rocket flight 36.219 US). Davis is a Co-Investigator and optical designer of the Space Weather Imager that flew on RAISE as a Payload of Opportunity.

    Davis is the Optics, Detector, and Calibration Scientist for the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), an ALICE-type instrument for NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO).

    Davis has authored or co-authored over 15 technical papers in the fields of ultraviolet spectroscopy and astronomical instrumentation.

  • Pat
    Dubon

    Company Name


    JUNO ROLE

    Ground Data System Manager.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Pat Dubon joined the Juno Mission System team June 2010. Prior to Juno, she was the JPL Line Supervisor for Project GDS Engineering. Dubon was Lead GDS System Engineer for the Dawn Mission from preliminary design to launch.

    She is very excited to have Juno launch coincide with Dawn’s arrival at Vesta.

  • Michela Muñoz
    Fernández

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Juno payload system engineer-instrument engineer (JIRAM, Gravity Science, JunoCam)/Juno instrument operations system engineer. Main Liaison between NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Italian Space Agency for the JIRAM instrument.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Michela Muoz Fernndez has twelve years experience in space missions including; ROSETTA Mission, Deep Space One Mission, Space Interferometry Mission, and the Juno Mission.

    She has participated in the operation and development of space systems and payloads: Juno Payload System Engineer, flight/project system engineer for the SIM Mission, electrical engineer (design of power distribution board) of the OSIRIS instrument for the ROSETTA Mission, Deep Space One telecommunications engineer. She has experience with Jupiter radiation environments and calibration activities for SIM and Juno. She has also done research in coherent optical communications systems for deep-space missions (Designed Coherent Optical Array Receiver for PPM Signals under Atmospheric Turbulence, Ph.D. Thesis. 2005. California Institute of Technology, Dept. Electrical Engineering).

  • Tim
    Gasparrini

    Lockheed Martin Space Systems


    JUNO ROLE

    Program Manager on the Juno Program.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Tim Gasparrini joined Martin Marietta in 1984 and has held various mechanical engineering assignments on the Mars Global Surveyor, STARDUST, and Mars Odyssey Programs. He was the Structures and Thermal Lead for the Mars 2001 Lander (the Precursor to Phoenix).

    In 2001 upon completion of the Mars Odyssey Launch Tim joined the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) team as the Mechanical Engineering Manager. After the launch of MRO, in 2005 he was assigned as the Phoenix Deputy Program Manager with responsibility for Mars Entry, Descent and Landing. In 2008, Tim was selected as the Mechanical Manager on the GRAIL Program. After the GRAIL PDR, he was assigned as the Program Manager on the Juno Program.

    Tim holds a Bachelor of Science in Ocean Engineering from The Florida Institute of Technology and an MS in Civil Engineering and an MBA from the University of Colorado. Tim is originally from New York and has been happily married for 29 years to Pam, with whom he has five daughters, who thankfully look like their mother.

  • Don
    Gurnett

    University of Iowa


    JUNO ROLE

    Collaborator on the Waves investigation. Provides consultation on the development of the Waves instrument and on the interpretation of data.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Don Gurnett is a Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa, where he has been on the faculty since 1965. He specializes in experimental space plasma physics and has participated as a Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on more than 30 major NASA spacecraft projects - most notably the Voyager 1 and 2 flights to the outer planets, the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Cassini mission to Saturn. His most recent hardware instrumentation project involved the development of a low-frequency radar for the Mars Express spacecraft.

    He is the author of more than 440 scientific publications, primarily in the area of magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research, and has supervised 51 student thesis projects.

    Professor Gurnett has received numerous awards for his teaching and research. His awards include the 1978 John Howard Dellinger Gold Medal from the International Scientific Radio Union, the 1989 John Adam Fleming Medal from the American Geophysical Union, and the 1989 Excellence in Plasma Physics Award from the American Physical Society. In 1994 he received the Iowa Board of Regents Award for Faculty Excellence, and in 1998 he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Amy
    Hale

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Instrument Operations Systems Engineer. Responsible for coordinating Juno science instrument operations, which includes working with the science teams, the spacecraft teams, and the other mission operations teams in order to plan and execute science observations.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Amy S. Hale has wanted to be involved in planetary missions ever since she saw the images coming back from Voyager in the 1970’s. She received her Ph.D. in planetary science and came to JPL immediately after, where she started working instrument operations for various Mars missions.

  • Jennie
    Johannesen

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Mission Design Manager. Responsible for managing the mission design and navigation activities in the development phase.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Jennie Johannesen was the Trajectory Group Leader for the Galileo mission and has served as a trajectory designer/analyst for the early Europa orbiter studies and for the Deep Impact mission. She worked on the Discovery proposals INSIDE Jupiter and JASSI, which preceded the New Frontiers proposal that became Juno. She was the Group Supervisor for the Outer Planets Mission Analysis Group.

    Johannesen received M.S. and Ph.D degrees in Aerospace Science from the University of Michigan and B.S. and M.S. degrees in Physics from Purdue University. She was awarded the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for her work on the Galileo mission and several NASA Group Achievement Awards.

  • Sammy
    Kayali

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Mission Assurance Manager, Juno Project.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Sammy Kayali is the Mission Assurance Manager for the Juno Project at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In this capacity, he is responsible for the assessment of technical risks for the Juno Project and management of the environment definition, radiation control, radiation test and characterization, reliability analysis, hardware and software quality assurance, and electronic parts selection and approval.

    Prior to this position, Mr. Kayali held several positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory including: Mission Assurance Manager for the Prometheus Project and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Mission, Manager of the Electronic Parts Engineering Organization and Manager of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program.

    Mr. Kayali’s specialty is in the area of compound semiconductor device reliability where he has over 30 publications, two patents pending, and a published book on the subject of GaAs MMIC Reliability. He has served as the Chair of the Government Microcircuit Applications &Critical Technology Conference (GOMACTech), the International Reliability Physics Symposium’s (IRPS) Compound Semiconductor Session, is a member of the Reliability of Compound Semiconductors Committee, and has participated and chaired a number of various other industry working groups and workshops.

    Kayali is the recipient of a number of honors and awards including the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He holds degrees from Texas A&M University and Sam Houston State University in Solid State Physics and Electrical Engineering.

  • Theresa
    Kowalkowski

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Mission Design &Navigation.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Theresa Kowalkowski has been a Mission Design Engineer for Juno since the Step 2 New Frontiers Proposal (2004 to present). Previously, Kowalkowski was the Mission Design Lead for JPL’s Advanced Concepts Team, or “Team X” (2005-2007). Kowalkowski was a Mission Planning Engineer for the Mars Exploration Rovers Project (Spirit and Opportunity), leading the development of the surface operations planning and was the lead Mission Planner for Spirit’s surface operations during the prime mission (2002-2004). She has supported numerous proposals, concept studies, and review teams.

    She earned her B.S. and M.S. in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from Purdue University.

  • Dorothy
    Lewis

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Ka-Band Translator System (KaTS) Contract Technical Manager (CTM). Manages/negotiates the technical interfaces of the spacecraft for the gravity science experiment.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dorothy K. Lewis has over 10 years of experience in the development and delivery of radio systems in different capacities. Prior to Juno, Lewis’ experience includes being the lead RF engineer for a Quickscat satellite follow-on, liaison for the Electra transceiver for several Mars missions, and parts interface engineer for the telecom subsystem and landing radar for Mars Science Laboratory (MSL).

    Her current responsibility is the lead designer/engineer for developing the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) for the Electra transceiver being used on the ExoMars/TGO 2016 orbiter.

  • Stefano
    Livi

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI); formerly The Johns Hopkins University Applies Physics Laboratory


    JUNO ROLE

    Formerly the JEDI Instrument Scientist before moving to the Southwest Research Institute. Played a critical role early in the JEDI definition by establishing closure between measurement capabilities and measurement requirements based on heritage instrumentation and his experience as instrument scientist on the PEPSSI instrument on the New Horizon’s mission to Pluto.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Stefano Livi has extensive experience with space instrument development.

    He was lead investigator for the development of a number of space instruments for measuring energetic charged and neutral particles including Polar CAMMICE/MICS, Cassini MIMI/LEMMS, SAC-B ISENA, and Rosetta ROSINA/RTOF. Livi was Co-Investigator on 13 other space instruments including AMPTE MSIS, Cluster RAPID, Polar CEPPAD, and Galileo EPD. He was Principal Investigator (PI) on a Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program for a space instrument to measure neutral gas composition, as well as PI on the Strofio Instrument to measure neutral gases in the vicinity of Mercury on ESA’s Bepi Columbo mission now in development and PI on a plasma composition instrument on ESA’s Solar Orbiter mission, now in early development.

  • Phil
    Morton

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Phil Morton will be the Payload System Manager for the Juno Project. Phil will report to the Project Manager, and provide technical and managerial responsibility for the implementation, accommodation, and verification of the Juno science payload.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Satellite Manager for GRACE Project: Managed contract with Astrium, GmbH (Germany) for implementation, test, and launch of two satellites for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Project. Managed contract with SS/LORAL for delivery and integration of K and Ka band Microwave Assemblies, and design and implementation of Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS). Performed role as Project Software Manager, responsible for the coordination and transfer of the AOCS design (US) to flight software implementation (Germany) and integration with science instruments (JPL, France). Managed Satellite Technical Team during Launch Operations, LEOP, Commissioning, and Science Validation Phases. GRACE Satellites have completed over 16,000 successful Earth gravity mapping orbits.

     

    Deputy Project Manager for Advanced Micro-Avionics Experiment: Responsible for management and technical implementation of JPL micro-avionics package planned for flight aboard Lockheed Martin VentureStar (X-33) spacecraft. Experiment package included advanced micro-avionics flight computer, MIMS three-axis gyro and accelerometer.

     

    Technical Manager for Cassini Command and Data Subsystem: Responsible for ATLO delivery, and spacecraft integration of Cassini CDS hardware and software components, including support through all spacecraft test phases, launch campaign, and launch operations. CDS post-launch performance has been excellent for last seven years.

    Flight Software Manager for Cassini Command and Data Subsystem: Managed Flight Software development team for Cassini CDS. Responsible for all aspects of development of complex CDS flight software in support of CDS I&T program, Cassini spacecraft, and providing technical support through all ATLO phases.

     

    Supervisor of Flight Subsystem Integration and Test Group: Responsibilities included end-to-end integration and test program planning and implementation for subsystem hardware and software development activities on seven major spacecraft projects: Galileo, Magellan, Magellan Radar, Mars Observer, NASA Scatterometer, Cassini, and Mars Pathfinder.
  • Paul
    Nowak

    Lockheed Martin Space Systems


    JUNO ROLE

    Business Manager for the Juno Flight System.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Paul Nowak has been a member of the Juno team since it was selected as the winner of the New Frontiers 2 competition in early 2005. He is responsible for all Flight Systems business functions to include cost and schedule reporting to JPL’s Juno project office.

    Paul has 27 years of experience in the aerospace industry. For 19 of those years he has been directly involved in the implementation of earned value management systems serving customers such as the United States Air Force, NASA, and other governmental agencies.

    Paul has been recognized for his efforts in the field by the Undersecretary of the United States Air Force and Lockheed Martin’s Chief Financial Officer. Paul holds a Masters Degree in Business Administration from Michigan State University and has served as an instructor in Earned Value Management for the International Space University’s Executive MBA Program. He and his wife Laurie reside in Denver, Colorado with their two best friends, Jade - their German Short Haired Pointer, and Marley - their Standard “Parti” Poodle.

  • Rick
    Nybakken

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Rick Nybakken is the Project Manager for the Juno mission at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. He has worked on Juno since February 2006 when Juno was still scheduled for a 2010 launch.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Prior to this position, Mr. Nybakken has served JPL in numerous capacities including Deputy Manager of JPL’s Mission Assurance Division, Technical Manager for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Flight System Contract, Task Manager for Advanced Transponder Development, Project Element Manager for the Sea Winds Electronics Subsystem, Project Element Manager for the QuikScat Radar Electronics Subsystem, and Technical Manager for the Cassini Antenna Subsystem. Mr. Nybakken has been awarded the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for his work on QuikScat and received numerous NASA Group Achievement Awards.

  • Glenn
    Orton

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Coordinate Juno microwave, near-infrared and visible results with each other and with Earth-based observations of Jupiter’s atmosphere.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Glenn Orton has 35 years of experience in acquiring and analyzing both Earth-based and spacecraft observations of the outer planets, beginning in the early 1970’s with ground-based support for the Pioneer 10 and 11 flyby spacecraft to create a coordinated model of Jupiter’s atmosphere. Years of observations paved the way for the discovery of Jupiter’s “quasi-quadrennial oscillation” wave structure.

     

    Orton has led observational teams that characterized the nature and influence of external impacts in Jupiter’s atmosphere in 1994, 2009 and 2010.

     

    He coordinated observations that led to the determination that the Galileo Probe that descended into Jupiter’s atmosphere in 1995 sampled one of the driest places in the detectable atmosphere, leading scientists to assess the need for determining the distribution of water across the planet and providing one of the key motivations of the Juno mission. Orton also coordinated observations that provided support for the Galileo Orbiter (remote-sensing) mission, and the Cassini Jupiter flyby.

     

    He is the author or co-author of over 160 articles in the open scientific literature.

  • Sembiam
    Rengarajan

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Electromagnetic design and analysis of A3, A4, and A5 Microwave Radiometer Antennas and S, C, and X bands.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Dr. Sembiam R. Rengarajan has been a faculty part time employee at JPL since 1999 and is a professor at California State University, Northridge (CSUN). He has held visiting professorships at UCLA, Chalmers University, Sweden, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain, University of Pretoria, South Africa, and the Technical University of Denmark. He has published 200 journal and conference papers in Antennas and Electromagnetics. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and a Fellow of the Electromagnetics Academy. He was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation (2000-03).

    Dr. Rengarajan received the Preeminent Scholarly Publication Award from CSUN in ‘05, a CSUN Research Fellow Award in ‘10 and a Distinguished Teaching Award from the Engineers’ Council in ‘95. He has received a dozen awards from NASA for his innovative research contributions to Spacecraft antenna research group and to the Deep Space Network Antennas at JPL.

    Dr. Rengarajan is presently Vice Chair of the Commission on Waves and Fields of United States National Committee of the International Union of Radio Science (USNC/URSI) during 2009-11 and will serve as the Chair during 2012-14.

    Dr. Rengarajan is a distinguished lecturer of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society during 2011-13.

  • Jennifer
    Rocca

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Project Verification and Validation Lead Engineer.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Jennifer Rocca serves as the Juno Verification and Validation Lead Engineer, enjoying her role to support the final testing and launch readiness process for this New Frontiers mission to Jupiter! She is a Flight Systems Engineer in the System Verification, Validation and Operations Section, Systems Engineering Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

     

    Jennifer came to JPL after graduate school in 2000 (B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Colorado, and an M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford).

     

    Jennifer originally started in the Mission &Systems Architecture Section, working on Mars Advanced Studies (including Mars Sample Return and Mars Outpost) and serving as a systems and cost engineer for Team X (JPL’s Concurrent Design Team). She moved to the Flight Systems Engineering Section to be the Instrument Systems Engineer on the GRACE mission, a set of twin Earth-orbiting satellites that would go on to map gravity over 1,000 times more accurately than the previous 30 years of gravity research. For this assignment, Jennifer lived about 50% of the time in Germany for 2 years, at the spacecraft contractor location. After GRACE launch, she joined the Deep Impact program where she was in charge of Mission Scenario Testing, the Launch Phase, and the Comet Encounter Approach Phase. After encounter (which was definitely the highlight of her career thus far – it’s not every day you purposely destroy a spacecraft and re-write the science books while doing so!), Jennifer put the spacecraft to sleep, and checked in on it from time to time until NASA approved its extended mission to Hartley 2 (Jenn even served on console for that second encounter – a thrill!).

     

    Jennifer worked on the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM-PlanetQuest) for almost a year as the Spacecraft Systems Engineer, and then worked on the DAWN mission as the Launch Flight Director and Phase Lead. Dawn is just now arriving at its first target, Vesta!

    Jennifer lives in Pasadena with her husband Matthew and two children Lorelei and Matheson.

  • Natalia
    Sanchez

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Project Verification &Validation engineer.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Natalia Sanchez has served in the Juno Project Systems Engineering Team as V&V engineer since 2009.

    Natalia graduated from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo in 2008 (B.S. Aerospace Engineering, M.S. Engineering) and joined JPL as a Systems Engineer in the System Verification, Validation and Operations Section, Systems Engineering Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Juno is her first experience in mission and flight system development. Natalia has also worked in formulation as Deputy Systems Engineer on Team X (JPL’s Concurrent Design Team), and in mission operations for the Cassini Saturn mission operating the Cassini Integrated Test Lab.

    Natalia is originally from Bogota, Colombia, and currently lives in Southern California.

  • Joachim
    Saur

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland


    JUNO ROLE

    Theorist who will work to insure that the charged particle measurement program provides the parameters needed to discriminate between prevailing theoretical ideas. Will analyze data and provide theoretical interpretation.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Joachim Saur has performed theoretical studies of satellite interactions and auroral physics within planetary magnetospheres. He is experienced in achieving closure between observational data and theoretical models. Saur created the leading model to explain Galileo plasma and magnetic field measurements taken locally at Io and Europa. He analyzed Galileo magnetic field data of Jupiter’s magnetosphere and interpreted small-scale fluctuations in the context of turbulence theory. Saur created theoretical models to explain main Jovian auroral oval and unexplained hot temperatures of Jupiter’s middle magnetosphere.

  • Robert
    Sharrow

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Payload System Engineer for the Magnetometer instrument suite (FGM and ASC) delivered by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Jupiter Energetic Particle Instrument (JEDI) suite delivered by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

  • Stuart
    Stephens

    California Institute of Technology


    Appears in:

    JUNO ROLE

    Mission Engineer

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Stuart Stephens been apart of the Juno team since early 2006 (the preliminary design phase) and has been the person responsible for developing and maintaining the Mission Plan document. The Mission Plan is a flight plan which describes the science mission at Jupiter as well as what the cruise part of the journey. It includes the inputs of several teams and individuals on the project.

     

    Stephens’ background is in Planetary Science. He has worked with the Juno science team to make sure their plans are incorporated into the mission. At JPL, where he has worked since 1995, Stephens learned the skills of a systems engineer, working productively with the rest of the engineering development team and flight operations team to put the whole plan together.

     

    Stephens works closely with the Mission Design and Navigation team, which has done the detailed refinement of Juno’s flight path (trajectory) to Jupiter. They figured out how to safely maintain the path during cruise and at Jupiter.

     

    Stephens has a PhD from Caltech, and has taught high school students at the Summer Science Program in California. His previous work at JPL has included project experience with Galileo, Cassini, Mars Polar Lander, Dawn, and NuSTAR, as well as concept development work on Team X, in the Mission Architect Development Program, and on Discovery proposals and other NASA competed mission proposals.

  • Paul
    Thompson

    California Institute of Technology


    JUNO ROLE

    Interprets the measured gravity and magnetic fields of Jupiter, with particular emphasis on the magnetic field spectrum and its possible relationship to the gravity field. The magnetic field spectrum may tell us about the conductivity structure (and thus state of matter) within Jupiter, the nature of zonal flows within Jupiter, and the nature of convective transport and beat flow. Secondarily, one of the team members who works on the “big picture”: The relationship between the observed properties of Jupiter and the formation and evolution of the planet and giant planets in general.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Paul F. Thompson wrote his Ph. D. thesis on the interior of Jupiter. He played a central role, along with E. E. Salpeter, in the idea that the gas giant planets are undergoing continuous differentiation (rain-out of helium and neon), apparently confirmed by Galileo.

    Thompson has had long-term involvement in research on the nature of the deep interior of Jupiter, with particular emphasis on the nature of the magnetic field, its generation and the impact it may have on the wind structure of the planet.

    Thompson is a participant in numerous NASA committees concerned with the strategy and implementation of solar system exploration. He has wide ranging research efforts in planetary science (including Earth), which have been recognized through numerous awards including Urey Prize (DPS), Hess Medal (AGU) and Fellow of the Royal Society (London).

    Thompson is President of the Planetary Science Section of AGU. He was Principal Investigator of an unsuccessful Discovery-class proposal (Quicksilver, a mission to Mercury) and team member of the almost successful Discovery-class proposal for an orbiter to Jupiter (INSIDE Jupiter).

  • Maarten
    Versteeg

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI)


    JUNO ROLE

    UVS software lead and UVS operations team lead.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Maarten Versteeg joined Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in May 1999. He worked on the design and development of the Ground Support Equipment for the Alice Ultraviolet (UV)-spectrometer instrument, which was launched in early 2004 on the eleven-year ESA Rosetta mission. The software supports the development, test, calibration, and integration on the spacecraft and supports the flight of the Alice instrument. Versteeg also completed the Rosetta-Alice flight software and is currently providing support for mission operations and flight software maintenance. Rosetta will reach the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenco in 2014 after a nearly 3 year hibernation period.

    Versteeg designed and developed the flight instrument and ground support software for a similar instrument as part of the New Horizons mission to Pluto called PERSI-Alice. The software was redeveloped as the instrument interfaces, hardware, and commanding structure had changed. He supported the integration and test activities of the instrument at spacecraft level. New Horizons was launched in January 2006 and continues supporting instrument mission operations and preparing for the 2015 Pluto Flyby.

    In 2005, Versteeg began the design and development for the flight and ground software for a third UV spectrometer instrument. This instrument, the Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), was delivered to APL in February 2008. It is a close cousin of the PERSI-Alice instrument; however, software was adapted to the different mission requirements.

    The instrument launched on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2009, is currently in a four-year extended mission and support work continues.

    In 2006, Versteeg started work on the software for UVS, a fourth incarnation of a UV spectrometer planned for flight on the Juno spacecraft.

    Versteeg developed and tested instrument software and supported instrument testing, followed by supporting tests at the spacecraft level. He developed procedures for checkout and operations and plans is to remain within the UVS IOT team as OPS team lead.

  • Stephen
    Watson

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)


    JUNO ROLE

    Juno Project Software Systems Engineer. Responsible for all project-level software development processes and standards; leading the software risk management activities, providing technical and managerial guidance and direction to all software development activities, negotiating and allocating interfaces, requirements and managed resources at the project and system levels, coordinating software receivables and deliverables among all project elements, reviewing and approving lower level software development plans, monitoring the top-level technical, cost, and schedule performance of all software development activities, ensuring software development team compliance with the project processes, coordinating the interaction between software development teams and the NASA IV&V Center, and supporting all project-level activities including technical and programmatic reviews, procurements, and proposals.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Steve H. Watson joined the project in 2006. Previously, he was the supervisor of the Ground Software Systems Engineering Group. His prior work included such assignments as Project Software Systems Engineer for the Mars Telecommunications Orbiter (MTO) ‘09 mission, software Cognizant Engineer for the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Science Data Processing System Framework Cognizant Engineer, and senior software engineer at Magellan Systems Corporation developing Global Positioning System receiver and post-processing software, where he was responsible for managing a multinational software team. He began his career at JPL as a software engineer specializing in image processing and scientific data visualization, supporting a variety of planetary and earth science missions.

    Steve has received several NASA Technical and Group Achievement Awards for his software development activities, and holds several patents for his work. He received a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and a Master of Science in Computer Science from Arizona State University. He is a licensed private pilot with instrument and seaplane ratings, enjoys wildlife observation and study, photography, and travel. He is currently building his own aircraft, a Van’s RV-7A.

  • Philippe
    Zarka

    Laboratoire d’etudes spatiales et d’instrumentation en astrophysique (LESIA), Le Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) & Observatoire de Paris


    JUNO ROLE

    Expert in low-frequency Radioastronomy (ground- and space-based ), space plasma physics (incl. theory and modelling), planetary (and exoplanetary) magnetospheres (structure and dynamics), atmospheric lightning and ionospheres, and signal and data processing. Collaborates most closely with the Waves experiment. Analyzes Juno’s observations of radio emissions from Jupiter’s polar magnetosphere (auroral and satellite-induced), performs multispectral correlations, theoretical modelling (in particular based on the ExPRES - Exoplanetary and Planetary Radio Emissions Simulator - developed at LESIA), performs remote sensing of the magnetospheric structure and dynamics. Coordinates ground-based radio observations (Nançay decameter array, LOFAR) in support of Juno, and participates in Education/Public Outreach (E/PO) activities.

    EXPERIENCE RELATED TO JUNO

    Philippe Zarka, born in 1961, is senior scientist at LESIA (Laboratoire d’Etudes spatiales et d’Instrumentation en Astrophysique), CNRS &Observatoire de Paris. Zarka largely contributed to the study of the radio emissions from the 4 giant planets and the Earth - as well as the study of the structure and dynamics of their magnetospheres - using data from several spacecraft (Voyager, Ulysses, Wind, Cassini, of which he is Co-Investigator or associate) and from the low frequency radio arrays in Nançay and Kharkov. On the observation side, he determined the location of magnetospheric radio sources at Jupiter and Saturn (particularly based on goniopolarimetric method), their directivity, polarization, temporal modulations at all scale.

    Zarka determined the rotation rate of Neptune, and found short-term fluctuations of the radio rotation of Saturn. On the theory side, he calculated the first planetary radio flux (of the Earth) and the first planetary radio spectrum (of Saturn), explained many characteristics of Jovian and other planetary radio emissions, and invented a method to constrain planetary magnetic fields from radio observations.

    He proposed a complete theory of the generation of Jovian radio bursts and related electrons acceleration. He co-pioneered the multispectral analysis (radio+UV) of planetary aurorae and discovered the UV magnetic footprint of the Io-Jupiter interaction. In parallel, Zarka participated to the first studies of Saturn lightning with the Voyager spacecraft and discovered lightning from Uranus and Neptune. He demonstrated their absence at Venus. He used radio observations of lightning to probe planetary ionospheres.

    Recently, Zarka published the first theoretical predictions concerning radio emissions from exoplanetary magnetospheres and planet-star plasma interactions. He leads the first large observation programs in that field, in Kharkov and as the Principal Investigator (PI) of the (exo)planets Working Group of the LOFAR radiotelescope.

    Zarka is (co-)author of about 140 papers in refereed journals and more than 50 papers or chapters in books. He received 8 NASA and 1 ESA Group Achievement Awards, as well as the COSPAR Zeldovich Medal (Comm. B - Planets).

    Zarka has a broad experience in education (at Master level) and public outreach (conferences, books, interviews in various media, art-science collaborative projects...).